4 Common Drug Possession Defenses

Possession of drugs is a serious charge that can be levied against you. Luckily, most criminal defense attorneys have a litany of defenses that they can employ that might correspond to your current situation. Although, in the latter, drug possession charges differ from state to state, they are all basically the same and most of the defenses here will apply to the state in which you were charged. Non-Possession One of the most common defenses that a criminal defense attorney will employ is the fact that you did not possess the drugs to begin with. Read More 

Acquired Hospital Infections And Medical Malpractice: Know Your Rights

When you visit a hospital, you expect your health to improve, not to decline. When a decline is experienced due to the negligence of a medical professional, it can be especially disheartening. It's estimated that 1 in every 25 hospital patients end up with an infection, such as staph. For those who find themselves in this category, increased symptoms and greater medical treatment are often in their future. Medical Malpractice Read More 

Work With Your Ex To Create A Great First Post-Divorce Holiday Season For Your Children

Going through a divorce can be a grueling process, especially when you have children. Not only are you and your spouse separating, but your children's family structure is also changing as well. The first holiday season after your divorce is finalized can be especially difficult for both you and your children. Here are a few ways you can ensure that your child's first holiday season with divorced parents is cheerful and full of joy, not stress. Read More 

How To Keep More Of Your Tax Refund In Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

If you file Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you pay off your debt gradually in three to five years under a payment plan devised by the court. Though you don't lose assets under Chapter 13, any extra income you are expected to get counts as disposable income, or income remaining after you pay needed expenses, including tax refunds.  The trustee will count it as part of the bankruptcy plan, and expect you to turn it over. Read More 

What Is An Alford Plea And Can It Help In A Criminal Case?

When you are charged with a crime, you must submit a plea of innocence or guilt. The plea you select will typically have an impact on your sentencing. For instance, a judge may give you a lighter sentence if you plead guilty and save the prosecutor the trouble of proving the case in court. However, there are several alternative pleas you can make, one of which is called the Alford plea. Read More